Phytoremediation

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Phytoremediation (from Ancient Greek φυτο (phyto), meaning “plant”, and Latin remedium, meaning “restoring balance”) refers to the technologies that use living plants to clean up soil, air, and water contaminated with hazardous chemicals.[1]

Phytoremediation is a cost-effective plant-based approach of remediation that takes advantage of the ability of plants to concentrate elements and compounds from the environment and to metabolize various molecules in their tissues. It refers to the natural ability of certain plants called hyperaccumulators to bioaccumulate, degrade, or render harmless contaminants in soils, water, or air. Toxic heavy metals and organic pollutants are the major targets for phytoremediation. Knowledge of the physiological and molecular mechanisms of phytoremediation began to emerge in recent years together with biological and engineering strategies designed to optimize and improve phytoremediation. In addition, several field trials confirmed the feasibility of using plants for environmental cleanup.[2]

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